Maybe it’s because…

…we’re in it for the fashion. Or maybe it’s because at heart, we’re a bunch of 87-year-old cranks.

But we sure are bone-tired of fashion magazine profiles on silver-screen celebrities.

Anybody else with us on this one?

When we were 18, and it was novel, sure. It was fun to read about Elijah Wood or Nicole Kidman or Whomever Else.

Now when we get to that section of the magazine we suddenly feel a million years old, like we’ve got a job to do we really don’t want to do.

We have the distinct sense that we’ve read them all. We’ve read every possible personality, from the shy kid who overcame a stutter or crippling anxiety to the action hero who’s actually just a really nice guy. They’re nice stories, don’t get us wrong. But eventually – at least for us – they’ve come to negate their original purpose of making celebrities sound like regular people by revealing that there are only so many personalities these celebrities have.

We are also tired of hearing that celebrities are just like us, only look at their sultry, smoldering poses in these $5,000 outfits.

(We’re also annoyed that the word ‘smoldering’ doesn’t have a ‘u’ in it. So…You know. We’re easily annoyed.)

What we would love to see instead, for example, is more “real people” – everyday shmoes on the street – looking stunning. Street style stuff, for example. We’re thinking profiles on street style bloggers, accompanied by a selection of their best work.

Or profiles of people in the business: models, designers, even the people with more unglamorous fashion jobs like merchandising or finance. We’d love to know more, for example, about the story of Zuhair Murad, who put out an absolutely stunning Spring 2016 collection. And not just the Vogue spot about the clothes themselves, but more about the designer’s past and the history of the business.

There are so many talented young designers fighting for a place at the fashion table. We’re sure magazines like Who What Wear or Harper’s Bazaar or Vogue could fill the space of infinite celebrity profiles introducing brands no one has heard of before.

And on the other side of the equation, Saint Laurent, for example (yes, we were also sad to hear about Hedi Slimane’s untimely departure): What does it look like for a brand to become so big, and what does that mean for its day-to-day operations? What does inside Saint Laurent look like on any given day? We’re curious.

Too often, we here at Decline + Fall Studios have to stop reading fashion magazines because the trite, clever, superficial writing makes us roll our eyes. This is an issue bigger than the celebrity profile, and it makes us sad.

It makes us sad that fashion writing so often lives down to the expectation that fashion itself is shallow, because at the very heart of it, what we wear is so inextricably linked with who we are. It isn’t shallow at all, but a deep and beautiful expression of our inner selves.

Fashion writing ought to live up to that.

In 2016, we here at Decline + Fall Studios are going to try our damnedest to bring you fashion profiles that matter. We want you to love fashion for what’s best about it, not roll your eyes at what’s worst about it.

We’re small, and no one knows about us, so we might have some trouble getting noticed. But everyone starts somewhere.

Please let us know what questions you want answered. Odds are, everyone else does too.

Here we go. Wish us luck.

Onward,

The Decline + Fall Studios team

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